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Subterranean Termite

Ant
Brown/Black
Color
1/4-1/2 inch
Size
6
Legs
Very Not
Danger
SCHEDULE MY INSPECTION Subterranean termites are said to be the most destructive wood pests in the United States and cause billions of dollars in damage. They are darker in color ranging from brown to black.They live in colonies underground and you could go years without detecting them. In order to get food such as wood and cellulose material, they create tunnels that reach ground level. Subterranean termites need moisture to survive. This type of termite can either be wingless or have wings with distinct patterns. A subterranean termite colony has one queen which can produce thousands of eggs in her lifetime. However, winged termites can also lay eggs in their colony. For this reason, as soon as you think you have an infestation, contact a professional immediately.

Signs of Infestation:

A subterranean termite infestation will have some obvious signs that point to it. When there is rainfall and the temperatures begin to warm up, you might begin to see swarms of the winged pests. The winged termites are called reproductives and look a lot like winged ants. The difference you will see is that the termites are slightly smaller and have straight antennas. As reproductives, these creatures mate, and when they are done their wings will shed. You will see piles of wings that are all the same size and look like fish scales on your windowsills. If you have an infestation, you want to be sure to get it checked out right away because these termites can cause a lot of costly damage.

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